Day #63 (late)

The “real” day 63! (yesterday)

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The day began with a really amazing photo taken from the top of the new Fore River Bridge by MassDOT. People who were familiar with the compressor proposal, and to some extent, the site were shocked by this photo. Find the port-a-potty, find the site:

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You see how small the proposed site it? You see how close the site is to the brand new bridge? Do you see how easy it would be to drive a car into it, to throw something from a moving car onto the site? How terribly hard it would be to secure the site? (at the very top left is WATER, open water.

After seeing this shot, I decided to finally take some quality time with Google Earth. The red circle is the proposed site:

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From another angle:

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Closer:

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Closer:

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See the close proximity to residents and businesses? See ALL of the dense population? Do you see all of the capacity for harm? I do.

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As I am compiling these photos, I see this article that is even more proof of what we know about natural gas going for export. The race is on to make the infrastructure in the US to send gas out of the country. It’s like the Gold Rush right now, but way worse:

“We have pretty well saturated the domestic market with natural gas,” says Eric Smith, associate director of Tulane University’s Energy Institute. “I wouldn’t refer to it as a glut, but what I would say is that we needed additional markets.”

Smith credits the shale fracking boom for the excess supply.

The proposed export terminals will ship to places like the Philippines, the Caribbean and Europe. And many will be refurbished plants that once received natural gas when the United States imported most of its supply.”

“Those terminals have become the down payment on export facilities,” says Smith, adding that converting them for export requires new refrigeration units to cool the gas into a liquid so it can be condensed and loaded onto a ship.”

and

“Since opening its Sabine Pass export terminal early last year, Cheniere has shipped 44 percent of its cargo to Latin America and 28 percent to Asia. In addition to last week’s inaugural shipment to Poland, the company has made deliveries to other European countries like Portugal, Spain and the Netherlands.

Grindal says there’s room for competition, but some of the pending two dozen projects won’t make it.”

Governor Baker: DO NOT ALLOW Massachusetts to become the superhighway for for-profit companies to make billions on exporting gas.

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